Borderlist – I made a thing

So listen, I made a thing. Yes, it is another to do app thingie but this one is built a bit differently. I work from so many lists on any given day that it is difficult to see everything at a glance.

I want to

  • See multiple lists at a time around the same topic.
  • Make a list, add some items, get stuff done, tick’em off.
  • Delete lists and clear my boards.
  • See it all on my phone without having to download yet another app.

No bells and whistles. No fluff.
I want a disposable Post-It Note system without all the sticky pads.

With these goals in mind I built Borderlist. It’s free, simple, and I use it every day.

Visit Borderlist

Because this is a tech blog, here are some nerdy details. The front end is built with Bulma (CSS) and, once in an account, it is all Vue using a Laravel based API to handle the data.

If you decide to give it a try, let me know what you think.

Setting Up, Creating and Updating a hasOne Relationship in Laravel

Not a lot on creating and updating a hasOne record so here’s what ended up working for me. I have my Site model and a SiteCache. SiteCache should have a single record per Site.

SiteCache migration (the Site migration isn’t that important so I omitted it here)

<?php use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema; use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint; use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration; class CreateSiteCachesTable extends Migration { /** * Run the migrations. * * @return void */ public function up() { Schema::create('site_caches', function (Blueprint $table) { $table->longText('json_content'); $table->unsignedInteger('site_id'); $table->foreign('site_id')->references('id')->on('sites')->onDelete('cascade'); $table->timestamps(); }); } /** * Reverse the migrations. * * @return void */ public function down() { Schema::dropIfExists('site_caches'); } }
create_site_caches_table.php

Site Model

<?php namespace App; class Site extends Base // base is a model that I extend, nothing of note in it { public function cache() { return $this->hasOne(SiteCache::class); } public function setCacheContent($content) { $data = ['json_content' => $content]; if($cache = $this->cache()->first()) { $cache->update($data); } else { $this->cache()->save( new SiteCache($data) ); } return $this; } }
Site.php

SiteCache Model

<?php namespace App; class SiteCache extends Base { public function site() { return $this->belongsTo(Site::class); } }
SiteCache.php

In use

<?php $site = Site::first(); $site->setCacheContent($json);
inUse.php

The creating and updating of the cache record on the SiteCache page isn’t as fluent as I’d like but with a little helper method on the Site model all is good.

Using Foreign Keys with SQLite in Laravel

When using SQLite for in-memory tests, I discovered that foreign keys are not used by default. Not so bad until you test cascading deletes and cry rivers of ones and zeros… Do I really have to make a test database?! I thought this was America! WHHHYYYYYYYYYYY?!?!?!?!?!?!

With a bunch of Googling I found that it is possible to enable foreign keys in SQLite. They are just turned off by default to cause sadness and confusion. To enable, you can use the code below.

if (DB::connection() instanceof Illuminate\Database\SQLiteConnection) { DB::statement(DB::raw('PRAGMA foreign_keys=1')); }

But where to put it? I don’t want that thing chilling in my app. I only need it for testing at the moment. I extend the TestCase class for all my tests so I dropped it in the createApplication method like so:

abstract class TestCase extends Illuminate\Foundation\Testing\TestCase { protected $baseUrl = 'http://localhost'; public function createApplication() { $app = require __DIR__.'/../bootstrap/app.php'; $app->make(Illuminate\Contracts\Console\Kernel::class)->bootstrap(); // when using sqlite, allow foreign keys if (DB::connection() instanceof Illuminate\Database\SQLiteConnection) { DB::statement(DB::raw('PRAGMA foreign_keys=1')); } return $app; } }
TestCase.php

I hope that helps someone. Here’s one of the articles that I pulled code from.

Unit Testing with a real Laravel UploadedFile object

I’ve tried, off and on, to unit test file upload objects in various Laravel projects with no real success. I don’t want to mock it and I don’t want to acceptance test a form. It doesn’t exist yet. I want a real file to so I can make calls over it to make sure I get all the data out I need. That I can detect an image, manipulate it using various packages, see the results and tweak till I’m happy and know that it is working when it goes into the app. In short, I’m TDD’ing the API of an object. If that makes sense.

In any case, after much Googling, testing, documentation look up and reading code I figured it out. Hopefully it helps someone else too.

Here’s the code and a bit of explaination…

/* Get byte size of file by doing the following at bash du -b FILENAMEHERE.JPG */ $file = \Illuminate\Http\UploadedFile::createFromBase( (new Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\File\UploadedFile( __DIR__ . '/files/img_test_file.jpg', 'img_test_file.jpg', 'image/jpeg', 1993588, null, true )) );

When a file is uploaded to Laravel, a Symfony component creates a UploadedFile object form the $_FILE global. This object changes hands several times and ends up being converted to Laravel’s UploadedFile object. Then it is on to being dropped into the Request object that you can pick up in controllers and such.

What this code does is manually create the Symfony object and then manually converts that over to Laravel’s UploadedFile object. Fun. The arguments you see in the Symfony object instantiation are…

  1. path to the file on disk. I stored it in a folder named “files” in the same directory as the test.
  2. file name.
  3. mime type.
  4. size of the file in bytes.
  5. how I feel inside. Actually it is number of errors. Same thing.
  6. boolean confirming that this is being used for testing.

I hope this makes someones day. I almost laid a golden egg when this emerged from my night of profanity.

Happy coding.